“Minster” model for the Ordinariates

Fr. Ed Tomlinson, a priest blogger in the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham in England writes on his blog of a meeting featuring their Ordinary Msgr. Keith Newton and members of three Ordinariate groups to discuss adopting the “Minster” model.

Yesterday evening we welcomed our Ordinary, Monsignor Keith Newton, to the parish alongside friends from Maidstone and Sevenoaks, to chair a special evening in which we laid out an exciting new vision to strengthen the bonds between our local groups and, hopefully, breath new life into the Ordinariate in the Sevenoaks area, which never got off the ground due to disinterest from its original pastor who has since been incardinated into the local diocese.

snip

In Pre-reformation England, larger parishes sometimes became Minsters; centres of excellence offering administrative and pastoral care to smaller outlying communities. This enabled local clergy to work in collaboration. Fr. Nicholas informed us that the original Minster was in Kent at…wait for it…Minster!

We then unveiled plans to make Pembury a sort of Minster to the outlying smaller groups in Maidstone and Sevenoaks. Under the patronage of St. Augustine of Canterbury this new ‘West Kent Ordinariate Mission’ should prove advantageous for all three groups. It is anticipated that clergy from St. Anselm’s will regularly visit Maidstone and Sevenoaks to celebrate Mass and encourage the people and clergy there. In return the smaller groups will be invited, from time to time, to share in the festivals at Pembury.

Much more with pictures at Fr. Tomlinson’s blog.  On Facebook, I came across an exchange between Fr. Tomlinson and Fr. Andrew Bartus, who said the following:

Ah! We’ve been doing the same in Southern California. I’ve called it the “hub model” (but I much prefer “Minster”) and Bp. Lopes wants it to be the model for our other regions.

Here’s a link to Fr. Bartus’ Ordinariate community.

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